Summary

by Hawke Robinson published Mar 13, 2016 08:10 PM, last modified Mar 13, 2016 08:10 PM
The RPG Research Project had its first sparks in 1985, and became formalized in 2004.

Originally starting as an  page essay at Realm of Inquiry, A School for Gifted & Talented Children in 1985, and later that year as a several weeks-long course in RPGs.

The RPG (Role-Playing Game) Research Project was founded by Hawke Robinson (W.A. Hawkes-Robinson) as an ongoing series of projects that include studies on the therapeutic and educational aspects of role-playing games. Where viable, additional emphasis is placed on determining any causality related to participation in all forms of role-playing gaming: tabletop, choose your own adventure, computer-based, or live-action (LARP). This research includes tracking any other projects around the world that use role-playing games as an intervention modality to achieve educational or therapeutic goals.

The RPG Research Project Website is also intended as a repository of all available research from around the world regarding studies on all forms of role-playing games from as many sources as possible.

The project utilizes a multidisciplinary approach including disciplines from:

  • Recreation therapy
  • Research Psychology
  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Education
  • and many other perspectives.

The RPG Research is a project of RPG Therapeutics LLC founded, and is the umbrella name under which the projects, website, communities, and other resources are identified.

To date, this effort is a non-profit project founded (and funded) by William Hawkes-Robinson, with the helpful support of many others.

This website is dedicated to building a community supporting role-playing game research in general, and any other individuals or organizations interested in sharing research information about the therapeutic or educational aspects of role playing gaming.

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