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Vampire: The Requiem RPG

by Hawke Robinson published Dec 14, 2011 01:55 AM, last modified May 17, 2016 02:14 PM
Though I've had the books for some time, it was not until this weekend that my eldest son finally indicated he wanted to make a character.

One of his friends was at first interested, but when he skimmed through the core book, he lost interest because of it being in his view so different from the LARP version, Vampire: The Masquerade that he was learning from a friend of his. I can not yet speak to that, though I do have many of the Masquerade books too, including the 2nd edition core book. So far...

We have not gotten far in character creation. Just the beginnings of reading through some of the process and creating character sheets.  I have to say it was a pain to get the original sheets in PDF form without being required to create an account on either RPGNow and/or RPGDriveThru sites. There are plenty of "improved" character sheet pads (as they call them) available on the web, but the genuine ones were difficult to track down. After doing so, I see why so many have changed from the original, the blood-red cursive script is very difficult to read. The styling is understandable in the context of the game, but not very practical.

It was also interesting to see some heavy fractioning of resources when trying to learn more about the game online. It appears that White Wolf is undergoing some sort of major transition regarding the game? The community appears to be very clannish, in line with the game itself with their blood lines. I have much more to learn about the system, setting, community etc, but it definitely has a different feel than most of the other RPG communities.

I will write more when we have made more progress with the character creation process.

Nashton
Nashton says:
May 17, 2016 09:09 AM
How would u go about creating a stewie character for requiem
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