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Israeli group attempting to use RPG's as therapy tool

by Hawke Robinson published Dec 05, 2011 03:55 AM, last modified Aug 15, 2015 12:20 AM
I was just running the usual periodic search for anything related to RPG research or RPG therapy, and found out there is a group in Israel recently attempting to use role playing games as an assist to therapy for children. The original site is in Hebrew, so I have to rely on the postings from "Purple Pawn" to keep posted. Though my stepfather is Jewish, if I could talk him into reading it for me....

English Purple Pawn blog posting:

http://www.purplepawn.com/2011/09/romach-using-roleplaying-as-social-therapy/

Right next to where I have just moved to in Raanana, Israel is an organization called Romach. Romach runs role-playing games as therapy for troubled kids.

Disclaimer: I am planning some joint gaming events with Romach.

The organizers have enlisted a psychiatrist and some therapists for the project. They trained them as to how RPGs work (their RPG of choice is Warhammer Fantasy; 4e is too combat oriented) and they received training on how to run the sessions to ensure that each child encounters situations that can help them work through issues. The sessions, and the club, look nothing like therapy, which is the point.

The therapy is supplemental to general therapy, and it is not intended for children with serious therapeutic problems. They are looking to expand their services to the army for leadership training.

Since they already had a club lying around, Romach also runs Warhammer and Magic events, represents WoW TCG in Israel, and is starting up board game events.

The original Israeli site: http://www.lance.co.il/

Their Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/lance.co.il

I have emailed the contact address in the hopes of trying to get some direct information if at all possible.

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